LJN Blog Posts

How To Lay Turf ... Like A Pro.

The best thing about laying turf to establish a fresh lawn is the rapid transformation. In this article, we will show you a step-by-step how guide on how to lay turf ... like a pro.

1.     Prepare your tools

For this type of project, you will only need a spade, some planks, a rake, a long knife, a garden hose, a wheelbarrow, a sprinkler, and turf cutter.

2.     Prepare your soil

Even the most expensive garden turf will not look its best if your soil is of poor quality. So, before you do any work, check your soil. If it’s too dry and crumbles in your hands, enrich your soil to encourage the turf's rapid and deep root growth.

Having strong roots will ensure that you have a lawn that’s drought-resistant and uses water and nutrients effectively. It also makes your lawn more visually appealing because they lead to a denser sward of grass.

If the area to be turfed has an existing lawn or is overrun by weeds, treat it with a non-selective weed killer at least fourteen days before you start. Then remove any unwanted grass with turf cutter.

3.     Calculate your turf and topsoil requirements

This will require a bit of math. Measure the area to be turfed then multiply the length by the width. Add 5% to the product. The result is the number of rolls you need. Since most turf suppliers roll out their product in square meters, it would be easier if you measure your lawn in meter units.

As to how much top soil you need, measure the depth, length and width of the area to be covered, then multiply them together to get the volume you need. If you’re not confident about your math, simply go online and search for “turf product calculator.”

You need AT LEAST 100mm of good soil that’s free from any stone, debris and weeds. Always, buy your top soil and turf from a reputable supplier. Also, have the top soil delivered a couple of days before the turf so that you can adequately prepare.

4.     Lay the top soil

Once your top soil has been loosened, it should be lightly compacted. You can do this by walking over the top soil and smoothing the surface as you do. Then rake the surface until the soil has been evenly worked over. Water the top soil at least two days before the turf arrives. Rake again before you lay the turf.

5.     Lay the turf

Start laying the turf immediately. If you have a round area, start from the center then work your way out. If you have a rectangular-shaped area, start from a straight edge. Lay the turfs closely to one another so that there are no gaps. (Gaps cause the grass to dry out). On the succeeding rows, lay them out in brickwork style.

Do not step on a newly-laid turf, but if you need to, walk over it with a plank. When you’re done, lightly press on the turf with a rake, making sure that the turfs have good contact with the soil. Do NOT use a roller. Also, do not pull a turf into a joint, always push. Fill in any cracks by lightly distributing topsoil and even the ground. 

6.     Water your lawn

Water your lawn immediately after you’re done. Do this for several days until the turf gets firmly rooted.

For more information on lawn care, you can visit our site. We have been delivering turf in Wiltshire and beyond for generations. Click the links to discover more.

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Gary RK replied to Duncan Miller's discussion Petrol strimmer
"This may help : 
https://www.einhelltools.co.uk/product-list.php?pg1-cid1955.html
or one of the other models listed on the sidebar"
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"Thanks Garry, seem to remember seeing that name on Google - will track down the model number too. "
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Gary RK replied to Duncan Miller's discussion Petrol strimmer
"I think the S&P petrol range of garden gear were made by or rebranded Einhell machines - might be worth a try...
Google is not always your friend ;)"
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