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The Basic Elements of Garden Landscape Design

Designing a garden can seem to be easy. However, when the garden is finished, some gardeners become disappointed with the outcome.

That's why it's important to study the basic elements of garden landscape designing to apply them during the making of the garden. By familiarizing the five elements of landscape design, a gardener can create a garden that is both visually appealing and organized.

The first element of garden landscape design is the form. A tree, for example, may have a form involving upright branches like pines. Or it may have a droopy form like that of a mulberry tree. The position of plants with careful consideration on their form gives the garden a unified feel. Should you require a tree to be cut down when developing the garden, it's important to seek the services of a certified arborist with an understanding of how to fell a tree.

The second element is the line. The line refers to the fact that a person’s eye movement is unconsciously guided by the garden’s borders, the arrangement and outline of plants and other structures. This is quite useful when the gardener wants to emphasize a certain point in his garden. The line of plants can subtly guide the eye movement to that area.

The third element is texture. Texture refers to how the surface of the plant is distinguished and seen, relative to the plants and other objects around it. The viewer usually perceives the texture of the plants by judging the size and shape of its leaves.

The fourth element is proportion. It is the requirement that the size of the plants and structures in the garden fits into the whole landscape harmoniously. An out of proportion garden disrupts the landscape since the height and size of the plants and objects do not offer a good transition.

The final element of garden landscape design is the colour theory. Colour theory is the relationship of one colour to the other. Expert gardeners use colour theory to provide unity or contrast in their gardens.

Colour theory can also set the atmosphere of the garden. For example, using flowers with warm colours such as red and yellow excites the viewer and gives off a feeling of liveliness. On the other hand, using flowers with cool colours such as blue or green invokes a feeling of relaxation and serenity.

Armed with this understanding, the gardener can now incorporate these elements to make a unified and beautiful garden.

For any professional gardener, it is imperative to own the correct landscaping equipment to achieve the best results.

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