Forum

Just wondered if it shows that you are interested to establish that the quotation conforms to the requirements or is there a danger that you are being pushy or perhaps desperate for work.

Personally, if I have received a quotation for a job, say an house extension I don’t want to be contacted. If I require further information or clarification then I will contact the person who provided the quotation.

But then again we are all different.

The reason for the post however is that I secured a job today due to a chance meeting as the potential customer had lost all my details including the quotation and could not contact me.

You need to be a member of Landscape Juice Network to add comments!

Join Landscape Juice Network

Email me when people reply –

Replies

  • If it is a local job that I pass and if no work has been carryed out after a month and it was a job I realy wanted then I call, if I havent lost there number, wounderful thing scrapes of paper, to see if the quote was any good but I dont usualy for much the same reasons. I put a time limit on the Vidality of my quotes usualy 1 month and ask for confirmation of go ahead in writing so sometimes i get a quick not saying the quote was unsucsessful instead.
  • I usually quote and move on. I'm not keen on being pushy ( it's not in my nature) and most people decide on the spot on the basis of a verbal quote.

    If I do a written quote I always try and put a two month time limit on it's validity.
  • PRO
    Depends upon the quote / job. If small one off's (under £500) then normally no. However where applicable I do mention on the covering letter that I will contact them in NN days to discuss the quotation with them etc. Never caused a problem and to be honest most will phone / Email back within the day anyway to either accept or raise a query.
  • PRO
    Due to recent postal strikes and ever more potent anti spam technology which will dispose of .co.uk emails it is almost essential to have to ensure that the quote has been delivered. We have had to resort to hand delivery or telephone quotes as a result.
  • I come from a commercial landscape background (have been a landscape technician, estimator and supervisor) and in these roles I have been responsible for providing estimates, quotations and budget costings. In that environment, the emphasis was put on me to always 'chase up' quotes.

    Why spend time, effort and money advertising, taking calls, visiting site, attaining prices, compliling estimate sheets and Bills Of Quantities etc. to be 'stuck in limbo' as to wether or not your in the running to get the work.

    What's the worst the customer can say? Yes, No or Can you adjust the price slightly to fit my budget of 'x' etc ?

    I take this attitude to my domestic garden design and build quotations. I have no qualms about contacting the customer after sending them a price and if this sounds 'desperate', good, maybe we should all sound 'desperate'/keen for work in this economic environment. I know my phone's not ringing off the hook at the moment and any lead is a 'firm' one to a self employed person.

    Also, a lot of my customers/clients are business owners themselves (quite a few builders!) so they understand what it is like to be self employed/a small business and don't mind/respect the fact that I phone them to ascertain if my quote is acceptable/somewhere near.
  • Completely agree.
    I give it about a week before making contact again unless we've agreed otherwise.
    On several occasions the client didn't receive the quote for whatever reason and I have re-sent it. You can't rely on Royal Mail and neither can you rely on Spam filters.
    In order to weed out (no pun intended) timewasters, I will, whilst on site give a verbal estimate of the work and then ask them if they still want me to provide a written quotation based on that figure. Often you can tell by their expression whether they are genuine or whether they can afford it.
    Exceptions are when I'm buried with work or when it's a small job and then it's a lower priority of course.


    david beasley said:
    I come from a commercial landscape background (have been a landscape technician, estimator and supervisor) and in these roles I have been responsible for providing estimates, quotations and budget costings. In that environment, the emphasis was put on me to always 'chase up' quotes.

    Why spend time, effort and money advertising, taking calls, visiting site, attaining prices, compliling estimate sheets and Bills Of Quantities etc. to be 'stuck in limbo' as to wether or not your in the running to get the work.

    What's the worst the customer can say? Yes, No or Can you adjust the price slightly to fit my budget of 'x' etc ?

    I take this attitude to my domestic garden design and build quotations. I have no qualms about contacting the customer after sending them a price and if this sounds 'desperate', good, maybe we should all sound 'desperate'/keen for work in this economic environment. I know my phone's not ringing off the hook at the moment and any lead is a 'firm' one to a self employed person.

    Also, a lot of my customers/clients are business owners themselves (quite a few builders!) so they understand what it is like to be self employed/a small business and don't mind/respect the fact that I phone them to ascertain if my quote is acceptable/somewhere near.
  • I have a meeting with the client to go through the quote and plans, then its up to them to get back in touch afterwards. I'll leave my card and paperwork with them, normally I can tell if I've got the job and I'll keep in touch with them. I don't put a quote through the post unless its just an amendment to one I gone through with the client previously. Works for me on the domestic side - the commercial side tends to be by email first then I follow up after a few days to set up a meeting. I like to talk them through the plans/work so they understand everything.
  • I don't always call after quoting, but I should and this reminds me that I should. I do think it is courtious and shows, not desparation, but interest in their custom. Customer service and well mannered staff are one of my businesses strong points. Follow-up calls are another way of strengthening this. They wont think it is desparate. Think about it - they called you originally. Why wouldn't you call?

    I do as Stuart does: ask for feedback in order to improve our service in future. Shows you are always striving to improve your business. That can only be a good thing and smacks positivity to potential customers.

    I am in process of having a lot of work done on my house. When central heating system was going in at begnning of year one of the most impressive businesses from a first impression/organised/well-presented point of view didn't get my customer. They did though follow up the quote. This impressed me. I am now in process of taking more quotes for some other work and they are on the list of companies I have asked to quote. I will add that in Ayr they have the best reputation among the plumbers and heating engineers. They are not desparate in the slightest (they do a large share of local authority installation ans servicing) but do have staff to ensure continue to have a job and presumably want to grow as a successful business.

    One of my weaknesses is being concise!!
  • PRO
    'silence does not constitute acceptance'

    sale of goods act 1979 !! BEWARE totally illegal......consumer protection will not like this printed steve.

    Dan Tarleton MSc, BSc (Hons) said:
    charging a £30 admin fee for not contacting your company after you send out a quote is actually illegal and could end you up in hot water if someone got that letter and contacted Trading Standards.

    It is a good idea to contact potential clients that you sent out an estimate or quote to and it is not being desperate
    1) They contacted you in the first place
    2) You spent time and money on seeing the job and sending a written estimate or quote
    3) Some people need a push in the right direction
    4) It is good sales behaviour
    5) It will prompt 20% of ditherers to decide

    Steven bowers said:
    As we go to a lot of detail on our quotes and we get over 90% of our work, it is in our best interests to get closure on quotes as soon as possible, nothing more frustrating than the person ignoring you..what`s a email or phone call to say no ! most people are just embarrassed...we put on our paperwork if we are not contacted in three weeks of the quote with information on rejecting or still thinking or yes ..we will charge a £30.00 admin fee to people who don`t contact us...we have never charged anyone and it works every time..!
  • PRO
    sometimes i do if quiet. with No pressure - you feel desperate though !

    it is good practise to do so - but i do if i need work.

    otherwise i leave them to e-mail me back to confirm or they are keen on site anyway and i go on instinct.
This reply was deleted.

Landscape industry Jobs

Experienced Landscaper

Employer: Down to Earth Gardening

Job Type: Full Time

Location: edinburgh

Down to Earth Gardening Limited are a well-established gardening company working throughout Edinburgh and the Lothians. We currently… Continue

Experienced Horticulturist

Employer: Down to Earth Gardening

Job Type: Full Time

Location: edinburgh

Down to Earth Gardening Limited are a well-established gardening company working throughout Edinburgh and the Lothians. We currently… Continue

Garden Maintenance Operative

Employer: The English Garden Co Ltd

Job Type: Full Time

Location: South Mimms

A high end garden maintenance company in South Mimms, is looking for YOU! Working as part of a 2-3 man team in London and… Continue

Latest blog post

Trade green waste centres

Start a landscaping business

LJN Sponsor

Advertising

Technical landscaping books

Blogs