• PRO Member
    A width of 1.2m is the minimum for wheelchair use, with 1.7m allowing two wheelchairs to pass.
  • Hi Kerry,
    Many thanks, this has confirmed what I believed to be correct.

    Kerry Jackson said:
    A width of 1.2m is the minimum for wheelchair use, with 1.7m allowing two wheelchairs to pass.
  • PRO Member
    Your welcome,

    if possible always allow a little extra just to be on the safe side
  • PRO Member
    From my My little Blue Pocket Book, it suggests ;

    .8m for 1 wheelchair with attendant
    .9m for 1 motorised wheelchair
    1.2m for 2 wheelchairs with attendants
    1.8m for 2 motorised wheelchairs

    Hope that helps...

    See attached..
  • PRO Member
    Path width

    Selected popular paths should be sufficiently wide for wheelchair and other disabled use. A width of 1.2m is the minimum for wheelchair use, with 1.7m allowing two wheelchairs to pass, or walkers to comfortably pass a wheelchair user. Some elderly walkers, the visually impaired or disabled walkers need the support of an able person beside them, and like to feel they are not holding up other walkers behind them. All users are likely to feel more comfortable and less threatened on a wide path with unenclosed edges. Family and other groups are more likely to use paths where there is room to walk side by side.

    Where revetment on slopes, surfacing or other construction is necessary, costs may rise with increasing path width. However, it is not usually sensible to cut costs by reducing path width. If construction or surfacing is considered necessary, at least side by side or two-way pedestrian use should be provided for, which means a minimum width of 1.2m. Where the site is suitable and resources are available, a path of 2m will not seem too wide. This is the width of a rural cart-track, feels comfortable and inviting for family groups and others to walk, and allows a range of uses. Wider paths also allow machine construction, which is very much quicker than using manual labour. It may be cost-effective to use a machine to make a wider path, rather than using voluntary labour to construct a narrower path. Some sites will have their own sources of hard-core, subsoil or other material which, with suitable machinery, can be used for path construction. Reclaimed road surfacing material may be available cheaply. Once construction is complete, vehicle use can be prevented by barriers at entrance points.

    The treatment of the path edges is important. Where the site is suitable and the maintenance funds available, mown grass is the best option. This itself produces a reasonably hard-wearing surface which can be used as an overspill. It also keeps sight lines open so reducing fear of crime, and prevents loss of path width due to encroaching vegetation. Keep shrub, hedge and tree planting well back from the path, leaving an edge of at least 2m. Any nearer than this, and frequent pruning will be needed.

    The diagram below shows some of the recommended widths for pedestrian, wheelchair and cycle use. Note that shared pedestrian and cycle use on a 2m width path is only suitable where cycle use is light and overspill onto the verge is possible. Signs or a 'white line' will be needed to indicate which side cyclists must keep to. Most paths for shared cycle and pedestrian use should be at least 3m wide. For full details see The National Cycle Network: Guidelines and Practical Details Issue 2, Sustrans (1997).

    Courtesy of the online Urban Handbook
  • PRO Member
    Should have mentioned source of info;

    RICS Blue Architect's Pocket Book
    RICS Green Landscape Architect's Pocket Book
  • PRO Member

    I just wanted to bump this topic to the top to demonstrate how well viewed it is, despite there not being any activity for nearly three years.

    Someone is searching for this information;-0)

    See also Sensory Trust for concise gradient and camber regulations etc.

  • Regardless of the regulations, its is good to have an awareness of the potential access for all in a garden. Great to see this being discussed here! :)

This reply was deleted.

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