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  • PRO

    I think what's key for any business is to understand the context in which advice is given; is it real life supported by facts/evidence from a/the business, is it repeated "business management" text, someone's view or just someone's musings from The Armchair....

    Actioning any advice can make a business succeed or fail. Due diligence is key and a quick check can tell you so much more .....

    Find a good UK based business book relevant to you, your business and your market.

    Discussions, however are a very different scenario where people/businesses are discussing ideas, concepts and formulating solutions to fit their businesses. That is extremely worthwhile.

    So, Ask questions. Ask for facts. Ask for examples. Ask for clarity. Ask for truthfulness and finally ask how that advice benefited that business.

    If it's not forthcoming; 'Buyer beware'

  • PRO
    While it is nice to factor in travelling time, it is not really the responsibility of the client. Obviously it is simpler to organise a round and limit the journey and when this doesn't work out, accept the fact that the guy who lives on the doorstep has an advantage. Doesnt matter how much you use business books, it's that simple.
    • PRO
      No it's not really the clients responsibility but if they want you to travel there because of your great reputation they will pay
      • PRO

        Richard's hit the nail on the head. A couple of days i can spend spend 2 hours behind the wheel, and earn a lot more than grafting all day locally. 

  • As someone just starting out I'm very interested in this thread! I've got three jobs to go and quote this week and must admit I don't know how much I'm gonna charge! Feel like I should ask a bit less while I find my feet but don't wanna get stuck with jobs that aren't really paying enough.
    • PRO

      Lee if a job takes an hour or less have a set charge - People often charge for 2 hours for small jobs as chances are you wouldn't be able to do 8 of them in one day and it covers you for the messing around

      3-4 hour job price for a half day rate

      6-8 hour job full day.

      The stuff in between, use your initiative ;)

    • You can always drop a job if you end up thinking you're not earning enough so don't worry about that. You won't be stuck.

      Think in your head how long it'll take, decide how much you want to charge per hour in your head, and give the customer a fixed price. Don't say you'll be there for X hours each visit.Say "It'll be £30 per visit, which will include me doing...a..b..c..". If they ask directly how long it'll take just say it'll be variable and you don't charge per hour. I have done that loads and almost always get the work anyway.

      • PRO

        spot on Dan! I also work out a lot of my pricing based on "what do I think a certain customer would be prepared to pay for this job", which is partly based on what people have been prepared to pay in the past for similar jobs. The busier I am , the more I push prices, when it's quieter I'm more realistic. 

        I never ever tell people how long a job will take as we always end up doing the job way faster than the customer thinks it will take, and that results in earning miles more than you could ever get away with quoting as an hourly rate.

        I very rarely lose a job on price but if I quoted £50 - £60 an hour or more I don't think I'd get too many!!

        If you're smart and efficient, good at marketing yourself, give a good service and work in a half decent location you can make a really good living doing this job. 

        You really need to be in a position where you get enough enquiries that you aren't bothered even if you do lose a few quotes, especially jobs that aren't as easy, then you can push prices up. 

  • We price it as a quote, rather than a hourly rate. Seem to do better that way, some customers to ask for a hourly rate.

  • Thanks for this advice guys. It's a week today since my last day of being employed but I'm finding £25 minimum or roughly £20 per hour for longer jobs, £75 for half day and £150 for a day is working well. I don't quote hourly rates though and find people don't mind me quoting for the job.
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